Slavic: Mita

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Mita, the death goddess, is represented with a lion head with an outstretched tongue. As Myda, an aspect or another name of hers, she is represented as a crouching dog.


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Slavic: Boginka

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Boginka literally means “Little Goddess”. Always described as plural, boginky (“little goddesses”), they are tutelary deities of waters. They are distinguished into various categories, under different names, and they may be either white (beneficent) or black (maleficent).

The root *nav which is present in some name variants, for instance Navia and Mavka, means “dead”, as these little goddesses are conceived as the spirits of dead children or young women. They are represented as half-naked beautiful girls with long hair, but in the South Slavic tradition also as birds who soar in the depths of the skies. They live in waters, woods and steppes, and they giggle, sing, play music and clap their hands. They are so beautiful that they bewitch young men and might bring them to death by drawing them into deep water. They have been compared to the Greek Nymphs.

Samodiva/Samovila are a type of woodland spirits known to Bulgaria, of which samodiva is the more commonly used, while samovila is more specific to Western Bulgaria. The words diva has the meanings of “wild”, “rage”, “rave”, “divinity” whereas vila means “spun” or “spinning” (such as tornado or a hailstorm spinning). The “samo-” prefix means “self-“. Iuda/Iuda-Samodiva generally refers to an evil spirit (or to Judas if used as a given name). These samodivas/samovilas are said to share a strong resemblance to Roman Nymphs (as well as to a lesser extent to fairies, elves and other similar spirits). They are described as playful woodland humanoid beings clad in white and wearing wreaths that can be beneficent or maleficent to men and women alike, depending on how they perceive being treated. They are sometimes young and beautiful, other times old and revolting. They are said to be found in woods, mountains, near fairy rings, near water sources where they bathe (especially near dictamnus albus) or in contrast dwelling in graveyards, dangerous places and to build invisible cities below the clouds when they are associated with malice. They can sometimes be attributed to: have wings, transform in various animals such as wolves, send ravens/crows as messengers, ride white-gray deer or bears, shoot arrows. The cult of the Vila was still practiced among South Slavs in the early twentieth century, with various offerings.


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Slavic: Dolya

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Dolya–Nedolya Goddess of fate, personification of the fate bestowed upon a man at birth. She is described as a plainly dressed woman able to turn herself into various shapes.2 When she is positive she is named Dolya, when negative she turns into Nedolya. The good Dolya protects her favourite day and night, serving him faithfully from birth to death; she takes care of his health and wealth, protects his offspring and makes his properties blossom. The evil Nedolya, also called Likho in later folklore, neglects the man to whom she is assigned, and thinks only for herself. It is considered impossible to get rid of Dolya, either in her good or evil aspect.


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Slavic: Nedolya

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Dolya–Nedolya Goddess of fate, personification of the fate bestowed upon a man at birth. She is described as a plainly dressed woman able to turn herself into various shapes.2 When she is positive she is named Dolya, when negative she turns into Nedolya. The good Dolya protects her favourite day and night, serving him faithfully from birth to death; she takes care of his health and wealth, protects his offspring and makes his properties blossom. The evil Nedolya, also called Likho in later folklore, neglects the man to whom she is assigned, and thinks only for herself. It is considered impossible to get rid of Dolya, either in her good or evil aspect.


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Slavic: Srecha

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Srecha–Nesrecha She is a South Slavic concept similar to the East Slavic Dolya–Nedolya. The relation between Srecha and Dolya has been described as the same between the Latin concepts of fors and fortuna, or sors and fatum. Unlike Dolya, a man may get rid of Srecha. She is represented as a beautiful woman spinning a golden thread, bestowing welfare upon the man to whom she is assigned. As misfortune, Nedolya, she is depicted as an old woman with bloodshot eyes.


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Slavic: Nesrecha

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Srecha–Nesrecha She is a South Slavic concept similar to the East Slavic Dolya–Nedolya. The relation between Srecha and Dolya has been described as the same between the Latin concepts of fors and fortuna, or sors and fatum. Unlike Dolya, a man may get rid of Srecha. She is represented as a beautiful woman spinning a golden thread, bestowing welfare upon the man to whom she is assigned. As misfortune, Nedolya, she is depicted as an old woman with bloodshot eyes.


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Slavic: Zorya

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Zorya Zorya is the goddess of beauty,2 virgin associated with war and with Perun. Her name literally means “Light” or “Aurora”, and she manifests as three goddesses, described as daughters of Dazhbog and sisters of Zvezda, with whom they are often conflated:
Zorya Utrennyaya (“Morning Light”), often conflated with Zvezda Dennitsa;
Zorya Vechernyaya (“Evening Light”),
Zorya Polunochnaya (“Midnight Light”).


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Slavic: Zvezda

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Zvezda Zvezda literally means “Star”, and refers to the planet Venus. It is the name of two sister goddesses, often conflated with Zoria, who represent the two phases of the planet Venus:
Zvezda Dennitsa (“Morning Star”), who is Danica in Serbo-Croatian and Dnieca in Polish;
Zvezda Vechernyaya (“Evening Star”).


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Slavic: Bereginia

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Bereginia Tutelary deity, or deities, of waters and riverbanks (cf. Old East Slavic beregu, “bank, shore”). In modern Ukrainian Native Faith she has been heightened to the status of a national goddess “hearth mother, protectress of the earth”.3 Some scholars identify Bereginia as the same as Rusalka.3 In Old Church Slavonic, the name was prĕgyni or peregyni, and they were rather—as attested by chronicles and highlighted by the root *per—spirits of trees and rivers related to Perun. The interpretation as female water spirits, bregynja or beregynja, is an innovation of modern Russian folklore. She is cognate with the German goddess Fergunna and the Gothic Fairguni.


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